Utilizing the Oscars

With over 37 million viewers watching, many Oscar award winners used their acceptance speech to address a social issue. From wage equality, to racial equality, depression, immigration and even simple advice, famous celebrities utilized their chance to speak with powerful messages instead of the usual “wow I’m speechless, there’s so many people I want to thank now I’ll keep talking until they cut me off” jazz we’re used to hearing. Nicole breaks down each example on her blog, but I found these images to nicely sum it up.

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My favorite was Meryl Streep’s reaction to Patricia Arquette’s, who won an award for her role in “Boyhood” (great movie), stand for equal pay. World Economic Forum estimated that women earn about 66% of what their male counterpart earns.

Graham Moore, who won for “The Imitation Games”, shared that he tried to commit suicide when he was 16 because “he felt weird and… different and I felt like I did not belong. So I would like for this moment to be for that kid out there who feels like she’s weird or she’s different or she doesn’t fit in anywhere. Yes, you do. I promise you do. Stay weird. Stay different. And then when it’s your turn and you are standing on this stage, please pass along the same message to the next person who comes along.”

Finally the Oscar’s were about slightly more than who is wearing what designer and came with what date. Winners are relating to others and speaking to their audience on a personal level that is easier to connect with. No one knows half the names they thank, but I’m sure many people can relate to a suicide story and will feel inspired by Moore’s words. I think it was great that so many celebrities utilized a prime opportunity to speak to millions about important issues and hopefully will help bring about a change as a result.

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